I discovered this photo at the Flickr site of the photographer and digital artist,  Hartwig Kopp-Delaney.  I highly recommend that you take a look at the site and also his website.

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I just love this artwork by Sue Jowell. It is made using various metals mounted on a wooden base. Size: 30cm x 30cm. I hope you enjoy too!

 

In my opinion, the latest album from The Boxer Rebellion is, so far, the one of best albums of 2011.  Their progressive, sublime, alt-rock sound with layers reminiscent of Radiohead, Coldplay and The Fleet Foxes is full of dark tones. However,  the album manages to maintain a beauty and aura of peace and upliftment even though the music is dealing with themes around the acceptance of death and loss.

What really adds to the musical experience is the wonderful artwork and  booklet type album cover.

The artwork and album cover design was created by the Icelandic artist/designer, Jónas Valtýsson. (click here to see his website , it well worth the visit).

Jónas explains on his website:”I wanted to convey the feeling and meaning of the album with a simple metaphor for life. A single leaf full of life on the front cover. The leaf ages step by step inside the booklet, ending on the last page where only the bare skeleton is left.”

Take a look below:

 

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Read the rest of this entry »

 

Complete triptych:  (Im)possible no. 4 – Mourning

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Canvas 1  – Friday (death)

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Canvas 2 – Saturday (mourning)

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Canvas 3 – Sunday (rebirth)

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Size:   600mm x 600mm , 1200mm x 600mm , 600mm x 600mm

Medium:  Acrylic on Canvas

 

As I reflect on the process of mourning, I am for a moment, stepping aside from the deconstructionist philosophy of Jacque Derrida and Post Modernism and  looking purely at the emotional and expressive reality of the event.

While viewing various works by other artists, I was deeply moved by the sorrow expressed in this painting.

 

youth-mourning

 

 The following description is taken from the Imperial War Museum, London, where the painting is on display:

“Sir George Clausen was an established Royal Academician when he painted Youth Mourning in 1916 at the age of 64.  It represents his personal reaction to the loss of a generation of young British soldiers during the conflict, and particularly to the death of his daughter Katharine’s fiance.

Youth, represented as a vulnerable young woman, mourns the death of her love, and by extension, the deaths of all young soldiers.  In the distance are the flooded battlefield craters.  This allegorical work combines traditional classicism and Christian symbolism with the stark landscape of the Western Front.”

Neil Young -Thrasher

April 25, 2009

 

 

I have started a triptych which is the final work in the (Im)possible series. The three canvasses exam Death, Mourning and Rebirth. I have also seen the three canvasses as reflecting on Good Friday. Holy Saturday and Easter Sunday. The main painting will be the (im)possibility of Mourning( Holy Saturday). As I worked through this process I have been considering  various forms of “Loss” .

Today I had conversation with a close friend regarding friendship and the loss of friendship and community. My friend mentioned that he was felt as if he was mourning past and lost friendships.

When Neil Young wrote “Thrasher”, in 1979, he was 34 years old, I first heard this in 1980 and I was 16 years old. It was the song that introduced me to Neil Young’s music and even though I have always love this song, I feel that a long journey of time is needed to fully appreciate this song.

 

 

Lyrics and brief notes:

Thrasher

They were hiding behind hay bales,
They were planting in the full moon
They had given all they had for something new
But the light of day was on them,
They could see the thrashers coming
And the water shone like diamonds in the dew. Read the rest of this entry »

 

  forgive

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